The Infinite Monkey

(the writer's blo{ck}g)

They starred in the movie…

(Źródło: jacquesdemys, via thebooker)



themusingsofacurlyhairednerd:

Nothing can compare to books and writing while it’s raining.

(via nevercutsamshair-deactivated201)


lordofvermin:

Mark Zug, art from the Dune trading card game.

lordofvermin:

Mark Zug, art from the Dune trading card game.


lordofvermin:

Paul Atreides - Mark Zug

lordofvermin:

Paul Atreides - Mark Zug


ianbrooks:

Diagnosis by Jena Priebe

A large installation made for the “The Last Bookstore” in downtown Los Angeles. Do you feel like the world is unraveling around you? 

Artist: Behance / Website


theumbrellaseller:

I just finished the second Matthew Swift book and my head is in my hands because…everything I could possibly have wanted out of urban fantasy these books have given to me. There are monsters made out of litter and discarded street signs. The mouldering Yellow Pages on the tops of bus shelters all contain phone numbers for local mystics. There are spectres, empty hoodies wearing headphones— cursing them with an ASBO will slow them down but not stop them completely. The Last Train goes round the Circle Line forever, the Black Cab can be called by those who have the number but the price is anything from a couple of quid to body parts or, presumably, worse; there is a Beggar King and a Bag Lady and a Lady Neon and a King Rat, there is a Midnight Mayor who protects the city and and the Maiden, Mother and Crone live beneath a museum stirring an ever-boiling cauldron of tea and London, oh, London is a fucking dragon (domine dirige nos). The Underground is magic. Electricity is magic, neon is magic, sewers and filth and dirt and spilt takeaways are magic, grafitti is magic, life is magic. These books are everything I have always believed about cities and I just want to lob them at people in the street and leave them on park benches for passers-by to pick up and read. 


nospockdascreppy:

prokopetz:

sarahtypeswords:

wetorturedsomefolks:

memejacker:

several-talking-corpses:

memejacker:

caligula had anime eyes

wait romans painted their marble sculptures
it looks like a cheap theme park ride mascot

yep
here’s a statue of Augustus

and here’s a reproduction of the statue with the colors restored 


i honestly think that what we consider the height of sculpture in all of Western civilization being essentially the leftover templates of gaudy pieces of theme park shit to be evidence of the potential merit of found art

"I tried coloring it and then I ruined it"

And you know what the funniest part is? The paint didn’t just wear off over time. A bunch of asshole British historians back in the Victorian era actually went around scrubbing the remaining paint off of Greek and Roman statues - often destroying the fine details of the carving in the process - because the bright colours didn’t fit the dignified image they wished to present of the the cultures they claimed to be heirs to. This process also removed visible evidence of the fact that at least some of the statues thus stripped of paint had originally depicted non-white individuals.
Whenever you look at a Roman statue with a bare marble face, you’re looking at the face of imperialist historical revisionism.
(The missing noses on a lot of Egyptian statues are a similar deal. It’s not that the ancient Egyptians made statues with strangely fragile noses. Many Victorian archaeologists had a habit of chipping the noses off of the statues they brought back, then claiming that they’d found them that way - because with the noses intact, it was too obvious that the statues were meant to depict individuals of black African descent.)

Reblogging again because these comments are important.

nospockdascreppy:

prokopetz:

sarahtypeswords:

wetorturedsomefolks:

memejacker:

several-talking-corpses:

memejacker:

caligula had anime eyes

wait romans painted their marble sculptures

it looks like a cheap theme park ride mascot

yep

here’s a statue of Augustus

and here’s a reproduction of the statue with the colors restored 

i honestly think that what we consider the height of sculpture in all of Western civilization being essentially the leftover templates of gaudy pieces of theme park shit to be evidence of the potential merit of found art

"I tried coloring it and then I ruined it"

And you know what the funniest part is? The paint didn’t just wear off over time. A bunch of asshole British historians back in the Victorian era actually went around scrubbing the remaining paint off of Greek and Roman statues - often destroying the fine details of the carving in the process - because the bright colours didn’t fit the dignified image they wished to present of the the cultures they claimed to be heirs to. This process also removed visible evidence of the fact that at least some of the statues thus stripped of paint had originally depicted non-white individuals.

Whenever you look at a Roman statue with a bare marble face, you’re looking at the face of imperialist historical revisionism.

(The missing noses on a lot of Egyptian statues are a similar deal. It’s not that the ancient Egyptians made statues with strangely fragile noses. Many Victorian archaeologists had a habit of chipping the noses off of the statues they brought back, then claiming that they’d found them that way - because with the noses intact, it was too obvious that the statues were meant to depict individuals of black African descent.)

Reblogging again because these comments are important.

(via carrionofmywaywardson)


ghoostdaughter:

Cross out what you’ve already read. Six is the average.

Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
Harry Potter series - JK Rowling
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
The Bible - Council of Nicea 
Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier
The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
Middlemarch - George Eliot
Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell
The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
Bleak House - Charles Dickens
War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
Emma - Jane Austen
Persuasion - Jane Austen
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden
Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
Animal Farm - George Orwell
The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
Lord of the Flies - William Golding
Atonement - Ian McEwan
Life of Pi - Yann Martel
Dune - Frank Herbert
Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon
Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
The Secret History - Donna Tartt
The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold 
Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
On The Road - Jack Kerouac
Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie 
Moby Dick - Herman Melville
Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
Dracula - Bram Stoker
The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett
Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
Ulysses - James Joyce 
The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
Germinal - Emile Zola
Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
Possession - AS Byatt
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
The Color Purple - Alice Walker
The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
Charlotte’s Web - EB White
The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
Watership Down - Richard Adams
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole 
A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
Hamlet - William Shakespeare
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
The Canterbury Tales - Geoffrey Chaucer
Paradise Lost - John Milton
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
White Fang - Jack London
The Portrait of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde
Queen of the Damned - Anne Rice
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson
The Call of the Wild - Jack London
The Importance of Being Earnest - Oscar Wilde
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz — L. Frank Baum
Don Quixote — Miguel DeCervantes
Where the Wild Things Are — Maurice Sendak
The Cat in the Hat — Dr Seuss
The Giver — Lois Lowry
Inkheart — Cornelia Funke
Divine Comedy — Dante Alighieri
Macbeth — William Shakespeare
Romeo and Juliet — William Shakespeare
The Child Called ‘It’ — Dave Pelzer
The Hunger Games — Suzanne Collins
The Diary of a Young Girl — Anne Frank
Night — Elie Wiesel
Les Misérables — Victor Hugo
The Odyssey — Homer
The Scarlet Letter — Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Brothers Karamasov — Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Eragon — Christopher Paolini
Song of Ice and Fire: Game of Thrones series— George R.R Martin
The Art of War— Sun Tzu
The Joy Luck Club— Amy Tan
Mary Poppins— P.L. Travers
Roots— Alex Haily
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings— Maya Aangelou
Naked Lunch—William S. Burroughs
Howl— Allen Ginsberg
Interview With a Vampire— Anne Rice
The Shining— Stephen King
Jim Hensons Labyrinth — A.G.H Smith
Percy Jackson and the Olympians— Rick Riordan
The Heroes of Olympus— Rick Riordan
The Kane Chronicles— Rick Riordan

(Źródło: antoinetheswan, via armellin)


Reblog if you have read fan fiction better than some published books

desert-neon:

bumblegabe:

Help me prove a point

I have never reblogged anything faster.

(via mkcafe)


hippopotatits:

kingsbellamy:

DO YOU KNOW THAT KIND OF WRITER’S BLOCK WHERE YOU ALREADY HAVE A PLOT, YOU KNOW WHAT TO WRITE BUT YOU DON’T KNOW HOW TO WRITE IT AND YOU JUST STARE AT THE COMPUTER SCREEN FOR HOURS UNTIL YOU FINALLY CLOSE THE DOCUMENT AND CURSE YOUR ENTIRE EXISTENCE 

CAUSE I DO 

so relevant right now I wanna cry

(Źródło: kingsbellamy, via tinareher)


quoteofmylife-x:

"I write to give myself strength. I write to be the characters that I am not. I write to explore all the things I’m afraid of."
-Joss Whedon

quoteofmylife-x:

"I write to give myself strength. I write to be the characters that I am not. I write to explore all the things I’m afraid of."

-Joss Whedon


amarepervivere:


More?

Shameless Plug: NYFW Favorites #2

flawedtalent:

He glanced up as I entered, and for a moment, looked almost surprised."Mr. Swift!""Ta-da!" I exclaimed weakly."You’re still…""Still not dead. That’s me. It’s my big party trick, still not being dead, gets them every time.”

flawedtalent:

He glanced up as I entered, and for a moment, looked almost surprised.
"Mr. Swift!"
"Ta-da!" I exclaimed weakly.
"You’re still…"
"Still not dead. That’s me. It’s my big party trick, still not being dead, gets them every time.”


thebooker:

Mathew Swift by Kate Griffin

[GOODREADS]

Genre: Fantasy

Two years after his untimely death, Matthew Swift finds himself breathing once again, lying in bed in his London home.
Except that it’s no longer his bed, or his home. And the last time this sorcerer was seen alive, an unknown assailant had gouged a hole so deep in his chest that his death was irrefutable…despite his body never being found.
He doesn’t have long to mull over his resurrection though, or the changes that have been wrought upon him. His only concern now is vengeance. Vengeance upon his monstrous killer and vengeance upon the one who brought him back.

Recommended by lazarusdown

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